Pastor Kaye's Blog

Choices

This coming Wednesday is commonly known in the church calendar as Ash Wednesday and the beginning of the season of Lent. From Ash Wednesday until Easter Sunday, minus the Sundays in between (because they are supposed to be “little Easters”) is 40 days, meant to mirror the 40 days Jesus spent in the wilderness prior to his public ministry.choices

The story of those 40 days in the wilderness is about the mental, physical and spiritual preparation that Jesus goes through in order to be ready to preach and teach the Good News of God.

(For the full video version, click here.)

In Megan McKenna’s book, Lent: The Sunday Readings, she states:

[T]he temptation in the wilderness story is short and powerful. The Spirit sends [or drives] Jesus out toward the desert… The desert in the Jewish tradition is the place of transition between slavery and oppression and the making of a people into the children of God ready to enter into the promised land of their dreams. It is a period of testing, of letting go of what was before so that what is to come can enter into them… It is also a time of privilege, of intimacy with God alone, who leads and teaches them in the deepest recesses of their hearts so that they come to know that home is where God is within them.

But in this wilderness time of learning, growing, and changing, there is a tension that needs to be worked out: the tension between the voices of the world and the voices of the Spirit. The figure of Satan (which in Greek simply means Hinderer) is the characterization of these voices of the world tempting Jesus with the illusory things of the world. Now, it seems to me that for Jesus to have been the deeply centered, grounded, consistent and stable spiritual leader he was, there had, at some point, to have been conscious choices on his part about how he’d live his life, how he’d make decisions, and how he’d treat other people. The story of Jesus in the wilderness offers us one possibility to how he found that center.

Here’s a proposition… what if we each made these 40 days of Lent a conscious walk in the wilderness for each of us? What if we became more conscious of the decisions we make on a daily basis? What if we pay attention to the tension present in those decisions between the ways the world calls us and the ways the spiritual path calls us?

Think about this tension for a minute. What are the things we choose between?

What do the voices of the world sound like?

  • Greed – you need more…
  • Power – you should have control…
  • Judgment – you’re better than them…
  • Sloth – what’s the point in trying…
  • Complaining – life sucks…
  • Elitism – you deserve…
  • Selfishness – you first…
  • Jealousy – they can take away what you have… 
  • Envy – they have something you don’t…
  • Fear – you can’t…
  • Violence – an eye for an eye…
  • Anger – don’t let them get away with that…
  • punishment – you should make them pay for that…
  • Self-loathing – you’re not good enough…

And what do the voices of the Spirit sound like…

  • Love
  • Compassion
  • Generosity
  • Understanding
  • Joy
  • Kindness
  • Forgiveness
  • Patience
  • Helpfulness
  • Hope
  • Trust
  • Equality

So… when we’re in a position to respond to a situation or person, our wilderness time calls us to first to check out which list we’re responding from.  And it is awesome each time we can choose to respond from the Spirit list. But, then things get a little trickier. You see, it is possible for our actions to be spiritual choices, but inside the voices of the world are grumbling. For example, you can give $5 to a homeless person on the street, while inside you’re judging them by condemning their dirty clothes, their laziness and you’re thinking they’ll probably just use the money to buy alcohol. Our generous outsides don’t match our judgmental, complaining insides.

I believe part of the goal of the spiritual life is for our insides to match our outsides the way Jesus’ insides matched his outsides.

I encourage all of us to use this time of Lent to work on being consciously aware of the tension and temptations that confront us daily, then to choose well. Perhaps if we make the spiritual choices long enough, our insides will begin to change to reflect our actions. It’s not easy, and it’s more than a 40 day process, but Lent is a good excuse to start.

Blessings,

Kaye

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